[op-ed snap] Raja Mandala: India and Trump’s world

Note4students

Mains Paper 2: IR | Effect of policies & politics of developed & developing countries on India’s interests, Indian diaspora

From UPSC perspective, the following things are important:

Prelims level: European Union, North Atlantic Treaty Organisation, G-7

Mains level: Trump’s new international relations stance & its impact on India


Context

America’s changed international relations policy

  1. A day before he met Russian President Vladimir Putin in Helsinki, Trump put the European Union — whose members are some of America’s oldest allies and friends — at the top of the list of America’s foes
  2. His outburst against the EU might be shocking, but it is part of an emerging pattern
  3. Trump quarrelled with America’s leading economic partners in the G-7 summit last month on issues relating to trade
  4. At the summit of the world’s most powerful military alliance — the North Atlantic Treaty Organisation, Trump accused Germany of being “totally controlled by Russia”
  5. Trump warned the NATO allies that if they did not contribute more to the collective defence burden, America would go its own way

Trump’s list of political demolitions in Europe

  1. One is the so-called special relationship between America and Britain. For nearly a century, the Anglo-American partnership has been the strongest bilateral relationship in the world
  2. Two, he is threatening to dismantle NATO, the world’s most powerful military alliance
  3. Three, despite the huge resistance at home and in Europe, Trump seems determined to enhance the engagement with Putin’s Russia
  4. Fourth, he is sustaining the pressure on EU and China to change the terms of economic engagement with the United States

Impact of trump on India’s diplomacy

  1. Trump is compelling India to rethink its longstanding foreign policy assumptions
  2. The consensus on economic globalisation and a relative harmony among the major powers — which defined the post Cold War era — is now breaking down
  3. The tensions between the US and Russia and Moscow’s deepening embrace of Beijing have certainly created problems for India

What’s in store for India?

  1. As a late convert to economic globalisation, India will have much to lose, if the current trading order breaks down
  2. Claiming that it is “WTO compliant” is a poor strategy when the big boys are changing the trading rules

What does India need to do?

  1. Delhi needs a flexible negotiating strategy founded in a more ambitious internal reform agenda
  2. Equally important is the need for India to come to terms with Trump’s deconstruction of the “West”
  3. It is rarely that a dominant power seeks to overthrow the status quo
  4. Trump is doing precisely that in questioning the utility of the collective Western institutions built after the Second World War and demanding a re-arrangement of burdens and benefits between the US and its partners
  5. Delhi must avoid conflict with the powers with which it has serious disputes
  6. It also needs to lift self-imposed limits on security cooperation with the powers that are ready to boost India’s material power

Way Forward

  1. Through the 20th century, India’s foreign policy has been shaped by the impulse to stand up against the West — initially against colonialism and later against Western security alliances
  2. In the 21st century, India’s efforts to construct closer relations with the US, have been slowed by the presumed political centrality of retaining “strategic autonomy” from the West
  3.  In these troubled times, transactional diplomacy, and not political posturing, holds the key to achieving India’s ambitious national goals
Foreign Policy Watch: India-United States
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