[op-ed snap] US policies toward India and Asia need strategic coherence

Danang : U.S. President Donald Trump speaks on the final day of the APEC CEO Summit on the sidelines of the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) leaders’ summit in Danang, Vietnam, Friday, Nov. 10, 2017. AP/PTI(AP11_10_2017_000071A)

Note4students

Mains Paper 2: IR | Effect of policies and politics of developed and developing countries on India’s interests, Indian diaspora.

From UPSC perspective, the following things are important:

Prelims level: Not Much

Mains level: How India’s interests can benefit the US, in the Asian region


News

Context

  1. The article talks about the US president’s Asian visit.
  2. And what should be done to counter the assertive Chinese behavior in the region

US President’s official trip to Asia

  1. With stops in Japan, South Korea, China, and now Vietnam, for the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation forum (APEC) summit
  2. In his address to the APEC CEO Summit, he outlined a vision of upholding a “free and open Indo-Pacific”

Is it possible to achieve the target of ‘free and open Indo-Pacific’ without India?

  1. The United States cannot achieve that goal without strong Asian partnerships—including with India
  2. Though India is not on the president’s Asia itinerary, the nomenclature alone—Indo-Pacific rather than Asia-Pacific—suggests that India stands rightly to play a central part in the Trump administration’s larger Asia strategy
  3. With long-standing allies like Japan, South Korea and Australia, India offers democratic and economic ballast to deal with the rise of China’s power

How can India counter a more assertive China in the region?

  1. The Indo-Pacific idea recognizes that a rising China has become more assertive as well as authoritarian, and it elevates Washington’s ties with India as an alternative model to all that Beijing represents
  2. By expanding Asia’s geographic net to include the world’s largest democracy, this larger region encompasses a greater balance favoring rule of law, freedom of navigation, open trade, and democracy

 What the US President can do to advance India’s interests(and its asian allies) in the region

  1.  The “Quad” grouping that adds Australia to the robust trilateral of India, Japan, and the United States appears on the verge of revival, a positive step
  2. In addition to strengthening ties to our traditional Asian allies, the president could start by clearly stating support for cooperative economic institutions like the APEC forum
  3. He should call explicitly for APEC to offer membership to India
  4. Asia’s third largest economy deserves to have a seat at the table, and it will help India to be more embedded in the premier regime focused on free and open trade in Asia
  5. To address the urgent need for infrastructure funding in the Asian region, the president should also support a capital base expansion for the World Bank

Trade issues between India and the US

  1. India recognize its famously difficult stances on trade and market access questions
  2. But a narrow focus on the $24 billion trade deficit with India (compared to more than $300 billion with China), should not distract from this larger goal
  3. India need to sort out market access problems and our difficulties with Indian intellectual property rights polices, but these questions are not strategic in nature

The way forward

  1. To meaningfully support a “free and open Indo-Pacific,” the Trump administration will have to be creative in building broad Asian partnerships, especially with its India policy
  2. We need all the allies we can muster
  3. A strong, stable, democratic India committed to a rules-based order will indeed be a “bookend” for the region. Washington will have to alter its economic focus to get there
Foreign Policy Watch: India-United States
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