Nuclear Security Summit (2010 – 2016) – What Next?

With 4 NSS underway, are we any close to getting a consensus – regional or global?

With the Nuclear Security Summit coming to an end in April 2016, the international community must garner requisite diplomacy to continue the legacy of the process.

The 2016 Nuclear Security Summit
source: nss2016.org

The 4 NSS held in this series were – 

  • 2010 – Washington
  • 2012 – Seoul
  • 2014 – The Hague
  • 2016 – Washington

How did this all begun?

The nuclear security summit initiative began with an April 2009 call by U.S. President Barack Obama to hold a global summit on nuclear security in 2010 as part of an effort to “secure all vulnerable nuclear material around the world within four years.”

Broad goals – 

  1. Address the threat of nuclear terrorism by minimizing and securing weapons-usable nuclear materials,
  2. Enhancing international cooperation to prevent the illicit acquisition of nuclear material by non-state actors
  3. Taking steps to strengthen the global nuclear security system

The pledges secured under this summits are referred to as “gift baskets”.

It isn’t relevant to go back in time and revisit the 1st, 2nd and 3rd summit but let’s have a look at the 4th (and the final one) –

A primary goal of the 2016 summit is to approve 5 action plans for international organizations and initiatives that will continue the work of the summit process.

The five groups are the UN, the International Atomic Energy Agency, Interpol, the Global Partnership Against the Spread of Weapons of Mass Destruction, and the Global Initiative to Combat Nuclear Terrorism.

Since these organisations are at the forefront of the summit, it would be worthwhile to know about them for IAS Prelims. Hail google!

Question:

Write a critical note on the outcome of the recent Fourth Nuclear Security Summit held in Washington.

While you answer this question – keep some points in mind – Russia gave it a miss, Iran was not invited.

Pakistan had ratified the Convention on the Physical Protection of Nuclear Material 2005 Amendment, but it still has not adhered to the International Convention for the Suppression of Acts of Nuclear Terrorism.

India may need to explore possibilities to negotiate with China and Pakistan to create a Regional Nuclear Security Summit process to prevent proliferation of weapons usable nuclear materials.

Source: Ref1 | Ref2 | Ref3

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