PM Modi’s 10-point agenda for renewing efforts towards disaster risk reduction

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Dear Mitron,

I welcome you all to New Delhi for this landmark conference, the first after the adoption of the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction.

First boley to maximum important for UPSC guys giving Prelims in 2017! Also research about Sendai Network and its predecessor. Kuch bhi pooch saktey hain.

2015 was a momentous year! Apart from the Sendai Framework, the international community adopted two other major frameworks to shape the future of humanity:

  • – the Sustainable Development Goals,
  • – and the Paris Agreement on Climate Change

For my UPSC Mitrons, make sure you have your notes made on both of them!

Disaster Risk Reduction has a pivotal role in supporting adaptation to climate change as well as sustainable development.

Use this line to flaunt your breadth of inter-connecting issues in your mains and essay papers!

Seven of the top ten countries in the world in terms of number of deaths due to disasters are in the Asia-Pacific. That’s a heck of a statistic to have!

A quarter century ago, only a handful of Asian nations had national disaster management institutions. Today, over thirty Asian countries have dedicated institutions leading disaster risk management efforts. After the Indian Ocean Tsunami of 2004, the five worst affected countries brought in new laws for disaster risk management.

What has India done for Tsunami relief and preparedness?

Hint: We now have a fully functional Indian Ocean Tsunami Warning System. Along with its Australian and Indonesian counterparts, the Indian National Centre for Ocean Information Services is mandated to issue regional tsunami bulletins.


10 point agenda for renewing our efforts towards disaster risk reduction

First, all development sectors must imbibe the principles of disaster risk management. This will ensure that all development projects – airports, roads, canals, hospitals, schools, bridges – are built to appropriate standards and contribute to the resilience of communities they seek to serve.

In India, the ‘housing for all’ programme and ‘smart cities’ initiative represent such opportunities.

Second, work towards risk coverage for all – starting from poor households to small and medium enterprises to multi-national corporations to nation states.

In India, we have taken bold steps to ensure financial inclusion and risk insurance for the poorest. The Jan Dhan Yojana has brought millions of people into the banking system. The Suraksha Bima Yojana provides risk insurance to millions who need it the most. We have launched the Fasal Bima Yojana, which will provide risk cover to millions of farmers.

Third, encourage greater involvement and leadership of women in disaster risk management. Women are disproportionately affected by disasters. They also have unique strengths and insights.

Fourth, invest in risk mapping globally. For mapping risks related to hazards such as earthquakes we have widely accepted standards and parameters. Based on these, in India, we have mapped seismic zones, with five as highest seismic risk and two as low risk.

Fifth, leverage technology to enhance the efficiency of our disaster risk management efforts

What are the technological efforts/ inventions from India’s side on Disaster Reduction Plan?

Sixth, develop a network of universities to work on disaster issues. After all, universities have social responsibilities too. Over the first five years of the Sendai Framework, we should develop a global network of universities working together on problems of disaster risk management.

Seventh, utilize the opportunities provided by social media and mobile technologies. Social media is transforming disaster response. How so?

Eighth, build on local capacity and initiative. The task of disaster risk management, particularly in rapidly growing economies, is so huge that formal institutions of the state can at best be instrumental in creating the enabling conditions.

Can you give instances of local involvement in India’s case?

Ninth, ensure that the opportunity to learn from a disaster is not wasted. After every disaster there are papers and reports on lessons learnt that are rarely applied.

And finally, bring about greater cohesion in international response to disasters.



In India, we are committed to walk the talk on the implementation of Sendai Framework. In June this year, India’s National Disaster Management Plan was released which is aligned with the priorities set out in the Sendai Framework.

To read through related news on Disaster Management – Read this Newstrail

To read more by Confused Billi – click here

By Explains

Explain the News

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PM Modi’s 10-point agenda for renewing efforts towards disaster risk reduction

source

Dear Mitron,

I welcome you all to New Delhi for this landmark conference, the first after the adoption of the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction.

First boley to maximum important for UPSC guys giving Prelims in 2017! Also research about Sendai Network and its predecessor. Kuch bhi pooch saktey hain.

2015 was a momentous year! Apart from the Sendai Framework, the international community adopted two other major frameworks to shape the future of humanity:

  • – the Sustainable Development Goals,
  • – and the Paris Agreement on Climate Change

For my UPSC Mitrons, make sure you have your notes made on both of them!

Disaster Risk Reduction has a pivotal role in supporting adaptation to climate change as well as sustainable development.

Use this line to flaunt your breadth of inter-connecting issues in your mains and essay papers!

Seven of the top ten countries in the world in terms of number of deaths due to disasters are in the Asia-Pacific. That’s a heck of a statistic to have!

A quarter century ago, only a handful of Asian nations had national disaster management institutions. Today, over thirty Asian countries have dedicated institutions leading disaster risk management efforts. After the Indian Ocean Tsunami of 2004, the five worst affected countries brought in new laws for disaster risk management.

What has India done for Tsunami relief and preparedness?

Hint: We now have a fully functional Indian Ocean Tsunami Warning System. Along with its Australian and Indonesian counterparts, the Indian National Centre for Ocean Information Services is mandated to issue regional tsunami bulletins.


10 point agenda for renewing our efforts towards disaster risk reduction

First, all development sectors must imbibe the principles of disaster risk management. This will ensure that all development projects – airports, roads, canals, hospitals, schools, bridges – are built to appropriate standards and contribute to the resilience of communities they seek to serve.

In India, the ‘housing for all’ programme and ‘smart cities’ initiative represent such opportunities.

Second, work towards risk coverage for all – starting from poor households to small and medium enterprises to multi-national corporations to nation states.

In India, we have taken bold steps to ensure financial inclusion and risk insurance for the poorest. The Jan Dhan Yojana has brought millions of people into the banking system. The Suraksha Bima Yojana provides risk insurance to millions who need it the most. We have launched the Fasal Bima Yojana, which will provide risk cover to millions of farmers.

Third, encourage greater involvement and leadership of women in disaster risk management. Women are disproportionately affected by disasters. They also have unique strengths and insights.

Fourth, invest in risk mapping globally. For mapping risks related to hazards such as earthquakes we have widely accepted standards and parameters. Based on these, in India, we have mapped seismic zones, with five as highest seismic risk and two as low risk.

Fifth, leverage technology to enhance the efficiency of our disaster risk management efforts

What are the technological efforts/ inventions from India’s side on Disaster Reduction Plan?

Sixth, develop a network of universities to work on disaster issues. After all, universities have social responsibilities too. Over the first five years of the Sendai Framework, we should develop a global network of universities working together on problems of disaster risk management.

Seventh, utilize the opportunities provided by social media and mobile technologies. Social media is transforming disaster response. How so?

Eighth, build on local capacity and initiative. The task of disaster risk management, particularly in rapidly growing economies, is so huge that formal institutions of the state can at best be instrumental in creating the enabling conditions.

Can you give instances of local involvement in India’s case?

Ninth, ensure that the opportunity to learn from a disaster is not wasted. After every disaster there are papers and reports on lessons learnt that are rarely applied.

And finally, bring about greater cohesion in international response to disasters.



In India, we are committed to walk the talk on the implementation of Sendai Framework. In June this year, India’s National Disaster Management Plan was released which is aligned with the priorities set out in the Sendai Framework.

To read through related news on Disaster Management – Read this Newstrail

To read more by Confused Billi – click here

By Explains

Explain the News