Mission Clean Ganga

Feb, 07, 2019

National River Ganga (Rejuvenation, Conservation and Management) Bill, 2018 Copy

Note4students

Mains Paper 3: Environment | Conservation, environmental pollution and degradation, environmental impact assessment

From UPSC perspective, the following things are important:

Prelims level: Particulars of the Draft Bill

Mains level: Maintaining ecological flow of River Ganga


News

Draft Ganga Bill, 2018

  1. The government has banned the construction of jetties, ports or “permanent hydraulic structures” in the Ganga, unless permitted by the National Ganga Rejuvenation Authority, according to the proposed ‘Ganga Act’.
  2. The legislation, formally called the National River Ganga (Rejuvenation, Conservation and Management) Bill, 2018, proposes to create a management structure that will supervise the health of the 2,500-kilometre long banks.
  3. The bill declares that the Centre will take control of the management, regulation and development of Ganga as the river is of unique importance.
  4. It defines Ganga as India’s National River.

For Maintenance of Ecological Flow

  1. The Bill lays down a host of restrictions to ensure the uninterrupted, ecological flow of the river.
  2. Currently, a host of dams in the upper stretches of the river lead to the river’s flow being obstructed say several activists and researchers, and persistent campaigns notably led by the late G.D. Agrawal.
  3. This led government finally recognising the need for proposed and existing hydropower projects to change their design plans to ensure minimum flows all through the year.

Cognizable offences under the act

The Bill has listed out a list of offences marked as cognizable which includes:

  • construction activities causing obstruction in the river,
  • withdrawal of ground water for industrial or commercial consumption from the land fronting the river and its tributaries;
  • commercial fishing or aqua culture in the river and its tributaries;
  • discharging untreated or treated sewage into the river.

Preventing Unauthorized Activities

  1. The proposed legislation specifies that “unauthorized” activities that cause obstruction or discontinuity of water in the River Gang due to engineered diversion of water or stoppage of water.
  2. Carrying out such activities are liable to a prison term of 3 years or fines upto ₹50 crore, or both.
  3. The legislation looms even as the government is developing a National Waterways Project-1 (River Ganga) from Haldia to Varanasi (1,390 km).
  4. The waterways project involves creating permanent and movable terminals that require dredging and frequent de-silting to ensure that minimum river depths for the smooth movement of the vessels.

Armed Ganga Protection Corps (GPC)

  1. The Armed Ganga Protection Corps (GPC) personnel will be provided by the ministry of home affairs and will be deployed by the National Ganga Rejuvenation Authority.
  2. The GPC personnel will have power to arrest those who pollute the river covering offences like obstructing the flow of the river to commercial fishing.

Section 54 : A Contentious Clause

  1. Section 54 of the bill on offences by companies, states that if an offence is committed by a company, every person who in charge of the company when the offence is committed and the company will be deemed guilty.
  2. But if the in-charge is able to prove that the offence was committed without his or her knowledge or that they exercised due diligence to prevent the offence, they will not be punished under the act.
  3. This section first strongly puts the onus of those heading operations and activities of companies that are damaging the river.
  4. But then promptly adds a protective clause by saying that action will not be taken if the offence was taken without his or her knowledge.
Feb, 07, 2019

National River Ganga (Rejuvenation, Conservation and Management) Bill, 2018

Note4students

Mains Paper 3: Environment | Conservation, environmental pollution and degradation, environmental impact assessment

From UPSC perspective, the following things are important:

Prelims level: Particulars of the Draft Bill

Mains level: Maintaining ecological flow of River Ganga


News

Draft Ganga Bill, 2018

  1. The government has banned the construction of jetties, ports or “permanent hydraulic structures” in the Ganga, unless permitted by the National Ganga Rejuvenation Authority, according to the proposed ‘Ganga Act’.
  2. The legislation, formally called the National River Ganga (Rejuvenation, Conservation and Management) Bill, 2018, proposes to create a management structure that will supervise the health of the 2,500-kilometre long banks.
  3. The bill declares that the Centre will take control of the management, regulation and development of Ganga as the river is of unique importance.
  4. It defines Ganga as India’s National River.

For Maintenance of Ecological Flow

  1. The Bill lays down a host of restrictions to ensure the uninterrupted, ecological flow of the river.
  2. Currently, a host of dams in the upper stretches of the river lead to the river’s flow being obstructed say several activists and researchers, and persistent campaigns notably led by the late G.D. Agrawal.
  3. This led government finally recognising the need for proposed and existing hydropower projects to change their design plans to ensure minimum flows all through the year.

Cognizable offences under the act

The Bill has listed out a list of offences marked as cognizable which includes:

  • construction activities causing obstruction in the river,
  • withdrawal of ground water for industrial or commercial consumption from the land fronting the river and its tributaries;
  • commercial fishing or aqua culture in the river and its tributaries;
  • discharging untreated or treated sewage into the river.

Preventing Unauthorized Activities

  1. The proposed legislation specifies that “unauthorized” activities that cause obstruction or discontinuity of water in the River Gang due to engineered diversion of water or stoppage of water.
  2. Carrying out such activities are liable to a prison term of 3 years or fines upto ₹50 crore, or both.
  3. The legislation looms even as the government is developing a National Waterways Project-1 (River Ganga) from Haldia to Varanasi (1,390 km).
  4. The waterways project involves creating permanent and movable terminals that require dredging and frequent de-silting to ensure that minimum river depths for the smooth movement of the vessels.

Armed Ganga Protection Corps (GPC)

  1. The Armed Ganga Protection Corps (GPC) personnel will be provided by the ministry of home affairs and will be deployed by the National Ganga Rejuvenation Authority.
  2. The GPC personnel will have power to arrest those who pollute the river covering offences like obstructing the flow of the river to commercial fishing.

Section 54 : A Contentious Clause

  1. Section 54 of the bill on offences by companies, states that if an offence is committed by a company, every person who in charge of the company when the offence is committed and the company will be deemed guilty.
  2. But if the in-charge is able to prove that the offence was committed without his or her knowledge or that they exercised due diligence to prevent the offence, they will not be punished under the act.
  3. This section first strongly puts the onus of those heading operations and activities of companies that are damaging the river.
  4. But then promptly adds a protective clause by saying that action will not be taken if the offence was taken without his or her knowledge.
Dec, 06, 2018

India Water Impact Summit 2018

Note4students

Mains Paper 3: Environment | Conservation, environmental pollution and degradation, environmental impact assessment

From UPSC perspective, the following things are important:

Prelims level: India Water Impact Summit 2018

Mains level: Strategy envisioned in the newscards


News

  • India Water Impact Summit 2018 was jointly organized by the National Mission for Clean Ganga (NMCG) and the Centre for Ganga River Basin Management and Studies in New Delhi.

India Water Impact Summit

  1. It is an annual event where stakeholders get together to discuss, debate and develop model solutions for some of the biggest water-related problems in the country.
  2. The discussions this year will be on the rejuvenation of the Ganga River Basin.
  3. There will be multi-country dialogue on the subject, with showcasing of technological innovations, research, policy frameworks and funding models from India and abroad.
  4. The efforts may take various forms including (but not limited to): data collection (sensors, LIDAR, modelling etc), hydrology, e-flows, agriculture, wastewater and more.

Three key aspects on focus

Spotlight on 5 states

  • These include Uttarakhand, Uttar Pradesh, West Bengal, Delhi and Bihar
  • The objective is to showcase the efforts and works going on within the respective states.

Ganga Financing Forum

  • The Summit introduces the inaugural Ganga Financing Forum that will bring a number of institutions to a common knowledge, information and partnership platform.
  • The Hybrid Annuity Model has redefined the economic landscape of water and waste-water treatment in India.
  • All tenders have been successfully bid out and financial closures being achieved.
  • The Financing Forum will bring together financial institutions and investors interested in Namami Gange programmes.

Technology and Innovation

  • Implementation of the pilot/demonstration programme known as the Environment Technology Verification (ETV) process.
  • This will provide an opportunity for technology and innovation companies from around the world to showcase their solutions for addressing the problems prevalent in the river basin.
Oct, 26, 2018

[op-ed snap] Think small: on Ganga rejuvenation

Note4students

Mains Paper 2: Governance | Government policies & interventions for development in various sectors & issues arising out of their design & implementation

From UPSC perspective, the following things are important:

Prelims level: Not much

Mains level: Unique measures required to clean river Ganga


Context

Poor state of sanitation in India

  1. The study conducted by the Centre for Science and Environment in Uttar Pradesh shows that in spite of working in mission mode to expand sanitation, 87% of faecal sludge expelled from toilets in urban areas is untreated
  2. At the national scale, a United Nations report of 2015 estimates that 65,000 tonnes of untreated faeces is introduced into the environment in India annually
  3. Viewed against the 2030 goal to achieve clean water and sanitation for all under the UN Sustainable Development Agenda, this depressing statistic shows how much work remains to be done

Reasons for this condition

  1. State support for improved housing and planned development has never been strong
  2. The National Urban Sanitation Policy of 2008 has not changed that significantly
  3. The Swachh Bharat Abhiyan promised a major shift, but it has focussed more on the basic requirement of household and community toilets in rural and urban areas
  4. Faecal sludge and septage is being collected from household tanks and simply discharged into drains, open land and wetlands

Using decentralised sludge management systems

  1. It is now time for a new approach
  2. Sludge disposal has to be decentralised and different from the strategy being used to clean the Ganga
  3. Immediate investments in decentralised sludge management systems would bring twin benefits: of improving the environment and reducing the disease burden imposed by insanitary conditions
  4. One immediate intervention needed is the creation of an inter-departmental task force to identify land to build small treatment systems for sludge, and to provide easily accessible solutions to houses that are currently discharging waste into open drains
  5. The business of emptying faecal material using tanker trucks needs to be professionalised and de-stigmatised

Way forward

  1. Decentralised sludge management systems are vital to achieve clean water goals
  2. All aspects of the business of sanitation need reform if India is to meet Goal Number 6 of the Sustainable Development Goals with egalitarian policies
Oct, 11, 2018

Centre sets ‘minimum river flows’ for the Ganga

Note4students

Mains Paper 3: Environment | Conservation, environmental pollution and degradation, environmental impact assessment

From UPSC perspective, the following things are important:

Prelims level: Ecological Flow

Mains level: River planning initiatives in India


News

Context

  1. In a first, the Union Govt. has mandated the Minimum quantity of water or Ecological flow as it’s called in scientific circles that various stretches of the Ganga must necessarily have all through the year.
  2. The new norms would require projects located along the river to modify their operations so as to ensure they are in compliance.

Ecological Flow for Ganga

  1. The National Mission for Clean Ganga has laid down the mandatory flow specifications.
  2. The upper stretches of the Ganga from its origins in the glaciers and until Haridwar would have to maintain:
  • 20% of the monthly average flow of the preceding 10-days between November and March, which is the dry season;
  • 25% of the average during the ‘lean season’ of October, April and May;
  • 30% of monthly average during the monsoon months of June-September.
  1. For the main stem of the Ganga from Haridwar in Uttarakhand to Unnao, Uttar Pradesh — the notification specifies minimum flow at various barrages:
  • Bhimgoda (Haridwar) must ensure a minimum of 36 cubic metres per second (cumecs) between October-May, and 57 cumecs in the monsoon;
  • Bijnor, Narora and Kanpur must maintain a minimum of 24 cumecs in the non-monsoon months of October-May, 48 cumecs during the monsoon months of June-September.

Norms for on-stream Project

  1. The compliance of minimum environmental flow is applicable to all existing, under-construction and future projects.
  2. Power projects that don’t meet these norms as yet would be given three years to comply and “mini and micro projects” would be exempt from these requirements.
  3. The flow conditions in these river reaches will be monitored at hourly intervals from time to time.
  4. The Central Water Commission (CWC) would be the designated authority to collect relevant data and submit flow monitoring-cum-compliance reports on a quarterly basis to the NMCG.
  5. The concerned project developers or authorities will have to install automatic data acquisition and data transmission facilities at appropriate locations at project sites within six months.
  6. The Central Government through NCMG may direct release of additional water in the River Ganga to meet special demand as and when required.

Ecological Flow is yet undisclosed

  1. The government hasn’t disclosed the existing ecological flows at these stretches while setting the minimum levels due to certain strategic reasons.
  2. Flow data isn’t made public by the CWC because it can be used by neighbouring countries to put pressure regarding hydro-electric projects.
  3. The flow will not necessarily represent what’s needed for the ideal health of the river.
Oct, 04, 2018

[pib] Rafting expedition “Mission Gange”

Note4students

From UPSC perspective, the following things are important:

Prelims level: Mission Gange

Mains level: Not Much


News

Mission Gange

  1. National Mission for Clean Ganga (NMCG) has partnered with Tata Steel Adventure Foundation (TSAF) to launch a month-long rafting expedition of a team of 40 members.
  2. It will be led by the first Indian woman to scale Mount Everest Ms. Bachendri Pal.
  3. The expedition will start from Haridwar traversing a distance of around 1500 km encompassing 8 major towns including Bijnor, Farrukhabad, Kanpur, Allahabad, Varanasi and Buxar.
  4. It will conclude in Patna in Bihar.
  5. The expedition is aimed for public outreach to heighten the awareness for keeping cleaner Ganga.
  6. In the expedition team of 40 members, several are trained mountaineers. Seven of them have climbed Mount Everest.
  7. The team during its stay in the towns will carry out cleanliness drives at ghats and surrounding areas by engaging and motivating more and more people.
Sep, 18, 2018

[op-ed snap] Saving rivers

Note4students

Mains Paper 3: Environment | Conservation, environmental pollution and degradation, environmental impact assessment

From UPSC perspective, the following things are important:

Prelims level: Not much

Mains level: River pollution reasons and mitigation strategies


Context

CPCB report on river pollution

  1. A finding of Central Pollution Control Board shows that the number of critically polluted segments of India’s rivers has risen to 351 from 302 two years ago
  2. The study also underscores the failure of many national programmes run by the Centre for river conservation, preservation of wetlands, and water quality monitoring
  3.  This is a strong indictment of the departments responsible for environmental protection

Why rivers are becoming more polluted?

  1. There is poor infrastructure available in a large number of cities and towns located near rivers
  2. Managing sewage requires steady funding of treatment plants for all urban agglomerations that discharge their waste into rivers, and also a reliable power supply
  3. Rapid urbanisation is widening the gap since infrastructure planning is not keeping pace with growth in housing

Measures that need to be taken

  1. Sustained civil society pressure on governments is vital to ensure enforcement of laws by the SPCBs and Pollution Control Committees
  2. On the industrial side, the plan to bring all liquid effluent discharge from textile units and tanneries to zero has to be pursued vigorously, giving industries the assistance to help them choose the best technologies for the recovery of waste water for reuse

Way Forward

  1. A 2013 World Bank study estimated that environmental degradation is costing India at least $80 billion a year, of which losses to rivers form a significant part
  2. Urgent measures are needed to revive India’s many dying rivers, protect its agriculture, and prevent serious harm to public health from contaminated water
May, 10, 2018

Only 20% of Clean Ganga Mission funds spent till March

Note4students

Mains Paper 3: Environment | Conservation, environmental pollution and degradation, environmental impact assessment

From UPSC perspective, the following things are important:

Prelims level: Read the attached story

Mains level: The issue related to the ‘improper utilization’ of the budget.


News

What is the issue?

  1. Only about a fifth of the Rs. 20,000 crore allotted for the National Clean Ganga Mission (NCGM) has been utilised till March 2018
  2. That is roughly the same proportion of the sanctioned money utilised the same time last year
  3. Amid complaints that the government’s marquee Ganga-cleaning exercise was dawdling, Union Water Resources Ministry had romised(in 2017) a “visible change” in the Ganga water quality by 2019

Financial account from the NCGM

  1. It says that as of March 2018, Rs. 20,601 crore had been sanctioned for 193 projects. So far, only Rs. 4,254 crore had actually been spent on their implementation

Main focus

  1. About half the money, or Rs. 2,814 crore, had been spent on establishing sewage infrastructure
  2. About 12,000 MLD of sewage is emptied into the Ganga across 11 States, from Uttarakhand to West Bengal
  3. At present, the capacity for sewage treatment is just 4,000 MLD; of this, 1,000 MLD is functional
  4. Also, till date, only 24 of the 65 ‘entry-level’ projects had been completed
  5. These ‘entry level’ projects are meant for cleaning the ghats and establishing new ones and cleaning the river front and the river surface
  6. They had been allotted Rs. 492 crore

Main source of pollutants

  1. Though the industrial pollution, volume-wise, accounts for about 20%, its toxic and non-biodegradable nature has a disproportionate impact
  2. The industrial pollutants largely emanate from tanneries in Kanpur and distilleries, paper mills and sugar mills in the Kosi, Ramganga and Kali river catchments
  3. The municipal sewage, at a billion litres a day, accounts for 80% of the pollution load
Sep, 23, 2016

Cabinet gives Clean Ganga Mission power to fine polluters

  1. Union Cabinet has approved changes allowing the National Mission for Clean Ganga to fine those responsible for polluting the river
  2. Earlier this power was vested solely with the Central Pollution Control Board
  3. The power comes from the Environment Protection Act
  4. This will help tackle 22 drains responsible for 90% of the pollution of the river

Which of the following are the key features of National Ganga River Basin Authority (NGRBA)? [Prelims 2016]

1. River basin is the unit of planning and management.
2. It spearheads the river conservation efforts at the national level.
3. One of the Chief Ministers of the States through which the Ganga flows becomes the Chairman of NGRBA on rotation basis.

Select the correct answer using the code given Below:

(a) 1 and 2 only
(b) 2 and 3 only
(c) 1 and 3 only
(d) 1, 2 and 3

Aug, 17, 2016

Progress on National Clean Ganga Mission

  1. The Union Water Resources Ministry is the nodal agency in charge of implementing the Rs. 20,000-crore National Clean Ganga Mission by 2022
  2. It has so far spent only around Rs. 320 crore, despite Rs. 2,000 crore being sanctioned
  3. Nearly 70% of the budget is to be apportioned for commissioning sewage treatment plants.
  4. This was partly due to a lack of consensus between the Ganga States on how money allotted should be spent though, according to officials associated with the project, there is better cooperation now
Aug, 17, 2016

Draft Ganga Act to draw from Highways Act

  1. News: A first-of-its-kind bill to regulate a river, the Ganga Act, is being drafted by experts
  2. It will draw from the National Highways Act and allow the Centre final say over States during disputes over management of its water
  3. Aim: To ensure that future disputes that could arise in the proper management of the river were avoided
  4. National Highways Authority of India Act: Empowers the Central government to have complete power over roads designated as national highways
  5. It also gives them authority over bridges, culverts and associated land stretches near highways
Jul, 07, 2016

Ganga clean up

  1. News: 231 projects would be simultaneously inaugurated at various states as part of cleaning up the Ganga by 2020
  2. Majority of the projects are located in Uttar Pradesh
  3. Ganga Gram: 400 villages along the river Ganga would be developed as Ganga Gram in phase-I with some IITs roped in for their development
  4. 8 biodiversity centres would be developed along the Ganga for restoration of identified priority species
May, 21, 2016

Is this is the last Yamuna plan?

  1. Context: a new project by Delhi Govt for cleaning of river Yamuna
  2. Yamuna Turnaround Plan: Proposed by Delhi Jal board, will cover preventing sewage from falling into the river, stop encroachment over the banks of the Yamuna
  3. Aim: To prevent even a single drop of untreated water from falling into the river
  4. Earlier: So many projects on Yamuna cleaning have spent thousands of crore but the condition of river remains the same
  5. Yamuna runs the length of 48 km from Delhi but polluted 70% in these regions
Feb, 20, 2016

Belgium keen to join ‘Clean Ganga’ drive

  1. Context: In this regard, a Belgian mission with companies specialising in sanitation will shortly meet Indian government officials
  2. Why Belgium? Because, It has specific solutions which are unique in the world
  3. What’s Unique? A Belgian Research Institute, Vito has developed a technology not only to clean sewage water but also to produce out of it, electricity
  4. Trade Relations: India and Belgium trade is huge. A big part of this is taken up by diamonds.
  5. What Belgium wants? To diversify its trade with India from the diamonds business
Jan, 27, 2016

Not just Water, other depts roped in for Ganga cleanup

  1. HRD Ministry– Set up a national-level institution or a university that offers courses on applied river sciences, to creating expertise in cleaning and rejuvenating the Ganga and other rivers.
  2. Ministry of Drinking Water and Sanitation-Prioritise open defecation-free villages along the river and create waste management facilities in those villages.
  3. Tourism Ministry– Take steps to minimise pollution by promoting eco-friendly tourism activities.
  4. Shipping Ministry– Develop sustainable shipping and river transport infrastructure.
  5. Rural Development– Prioritise implementation of PURA (Providing Urban Amenities in Rural Areas) programme in villages along the Ganga.
  6. AYUSH– Develop conservation plan for medicinal plants in Gangetic region * Ensure medicinal biodiversity.
  7. Youth Affairs and Sports– Encourage youth, volunteers and sportspersons to engage in activities related to Ganga cleaning.
Jan, 20, 2016

Poor Ganga

Ganga cleaning project remained an intractable problem due to “bureaucratic quagmire”.

  1. Any proposal regarding the Ganga has to satisfy and require the active cooperation of no less than seven to nine departments, both at the Central and state levels
  2. The current controversy is about the fate of 6 hydel projects in the Upper Ganga .
  3. The environment ministry against the clearly stated position of the water resources ministry has given its nod to five of the six projects in question.
  4. It will not only impede the government’s plans of rejuvenating the Ganga.
  5. But also smudge the policy clarity that businesses have been demanding in India.
Jan, 14, 2016

High-power body to lead ‘Namami Gange’

  1. The Central govt will be setting up a Special Purpose Vehicle (SPV) for its ambitious Namami Gange programme.
  2. The Chief Secretaries of all States through which the Ganga passes will be made members of the board of this SPV.
  3. Some selected municipal commissioners of big cities on the Ganga route will also be made members of the board.
  4. SPV will help coalesce all the different strands of various ministries into one coherent plan.
  5. A major conference called Jal Manthan will be held to discuss all the issues, and to carve out a special plan for the Ganga.
Jan, 07, 2016

Government brings paradigm shift in Namami Gange

  1. The Union Cabinet has approved the proposal for taking up Hybrid Annuity based PPP model under Namami Gange Programme.
  2. It aims to reform the wastewater sector in India.
  3. The model will now be adopted to ensure performance, efficiency, viability and sustainability.
  4. In this model, a part of the capital investment (upto 40%) will be paid by govt and the balance through an annuity over the contract duration upto 20 years.
Jan, 07, 2016

First Company of Ganga Task Force deployed

  1. As a major initiative towards fast track implementation of Namami Gange Programme.
  2. The first company of Ganga Task force Battalion was deployed at Garhmukteshwar (U.P.) recently.
  3. Three such companies will be deployed soon at Kanpur, Varanasi and Allahabad.
  4. The Jawans of the Ganga Task force will be deployed on the banks of the river Ganga to ensure that industry and civilians do not pollute the river.
Dec, 14, 2015

Government to Rope in CPSUs in Namami Gange Programme

  1. Govt. is initiating a number of entry level activities which will lead to visible results in a short time frame.
  2. These activities will include:
    • Repair, modernization and provision of public amenities at ghats.
    • Cleaning of the river surface.
    • Treatment of directly discharging drains in villages along Ganga.
    • Repair, renovation and construction of crematoria.
  3. In the medium term, it is targeting creation of sewage treatment infrastructure on priority in all 118 cities and towns on the banks of Ganga.
  4. The Ministry has divided the entire length of Ganga in 5 stretches coinciding with the boundaries of the states and allocated them to few CPSUs.
  5. These PSUs will take up the entry level activities and the assessment work in their designated stretches and will be responsible for implementation.
Oct, 27, 2015

Clean Ganga: Corporates to fix sewage in towns

The government has been inviting corporates, both in the public and private sector, to ‘adopt’ towns and cities of their choice and fix the sewerage system there.

  1. The govt. has decided that urban sewage management would be entrusted to corporate houses instead of municipal and civic agencies.
  2. There are 118 towns and cities on the bank of the Ganga and each one of them is up for ‘adoption’ by corporate groups.
  3. The companies are being asked to invest in improving sewage networks and setting up treatment plants.
  4. The companies can recover their investment, and also make profits, from the fixed annuities that the government will pay them during this period.
  5. The urban local bodies, especially in smaller towns, did not have the capacity or expertise to plan and execute these projects.
May, 30, 2015

Clean Ganga: Reviving a Lifeline

  1. The 1st Ganga Action Plan was announced in 1986.
  2. In 2015, Centre allocated 20000 crore for “Namami Ganga” project.
  3. 13000 crore- Maintaining existing treatment plants and installing new ones.
  4. 7000 crore- Completing pending sewage treatment plants.

    Project priorities – Reducing the volume of raw sewage in river, maintain ghats, form Ganga task force, rope in locals for conservation efforts and monitoring pollution from central server.

May, 19, 2015

Clean Ganga project seeks corporate, NRI participation

  1. The urgent need is to bring down lean season BOD levels in the river to 10 mg/litre/day.
  2. The Total Suspended Solid levels to 10 mg/litre/day.
  3. And the Total Faecal Coliform to 100 mg/litre/day. Right now all of these run in lakhs.
  4. The Rs. 20,000 crore Namami Gange project is spread over five years and covers 41 tributaries of Ganga.
Mar, 15, 2015

IIT roadmap for Ganga revival

  1. Earlier this January, the SC bench had asked the govt. to provide concrete steps in a report, which would in “layman’s words” explain how the national river would be cleaned.
  2. The report has now been submitted. It says that the wholesomeness of the river can be grasped in terms of 4 defining concepts.
  3. “Aviral Dhara” (Continuous Flow”), “Nirmal Dhara”(“Unpolluted Flow”), Geologic Entity, and Ecological Entity.

    Discuss: There was a ques. on gangetic dolphins in CSAT 2014. You might want to patch up such smaller details along with policy matters.

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