Textile Sector – Cotton, Jute, Wool, Silk, Handloom, etc.

Textile Sector – Cotton, Jute, Wool, Silk, Handloom, etc.

Recent woes of the jute industry in West Bengal

Note4Students

From UPSC perspective, the following things are important :

Prelims level : Jute cultivation in India

Mains level : Read the attached story

Member of Parliament (MP) from Barrackpore constituency in West Bengal met the Union Textile about issues concerning jute farmers, workers and the overall jute industry.

What is the news?

  • The Barrackpore MP had earlier written to West Bengal CM, seeking her intervention into the “arbitrary decision” of capping the price for procuring raw jute from the mills.
  • He was referring to the Office of the Jute Commissioner (JCO)’s September 30 notification mandating that no entity would be allowed to purchase or sell raw jute at a price exceeding ₹6,500 per quintal.

What is Jute?

  • Jute is the only crop where earnings begin to trickle in way before the final harvest.
  • The seeds are planted between April and May and harvested between July and August.
  • The leaves can be sold in vegetable markets for nearly two months of the four-month jute crop cycle.
  • The tall, hardy grass shoots up to 2.5 metres and each part of it has several uses.
  • The outer layer of the stem produces the fibre that goes into making jute products.
  • But the leaves can be cooked, the inner woody stems can be used to manufacture paper and the roots, which are left in the ground after harvest, improve the yield of subsequent crops.
  • A ‘Golden Fibre Revolution’ has long been called for by various committees, but the jute industry is in dire need of basic reforms.

Jute production in India

  • India is the world’s biggest producer of jute , followed by Bangladesh.
  • Jute is primarily grown in West Bengal, Odisha, Assam, Meghalaya, Tripura and Andhra Pradesh.
  • The jute industry in India is 150 years old.
  • There are about 70 jute mills in the country, of which about 60 are in West Bengal along both the banks of river Hooghly.
  • Jute production is a labour-intensive industry. It employs about two lakh workers in the West Bengal alone and 4 lakh workers across the country.

Significance of Jute

  • Compared to rice, jute requires very little water and fertiliser.
  • It is largely pest-resistant, and its rapid growth spurt ensures that weeds don’t stand a chance.
  • Jute is the second most abundant natural fibre in the world.
  • It has high tensile strength, acoustic and thermal insulation, breathability, low extensibility, ease of blending with both synthetic and natural fibres, and antistatic properties.
  • Jute can be used: for insulation (replacing glass wool), geotextiles, activated carbon powder, wall coverings, flooring, garments, rugs, ropes, gunny bags, handicrafts, curtains, carpet backings, paper, sandals, carry bags, and furniture.

Why in news now?

  • Mills are now procuring raw jute at prices higher than what they are selling them at after processing.
  • The government has a fixed Minimum Support Price (MSP) for raw jute procurement from farmers, which is ₹4,750 per quintal for the 2022-23 season.
  • However, as the executive stated, this reached his mill at ₹7,200 per quintal, that is, ₹700 more than the ₹6,500 per quintal cap for the final product.
  • Though the Union government has come up with several schemes to prevent de-hoarding, the executive believes the mechanism requires a certain “systematic regulation”.

What happened to supply?

  • What made the situation particularly worrisome recently was the occurrence of Cyclone Amphan in May 2020 and the subsequent rains in major jute producing States.
  • These events led to lower acreage, which in turn led to lower production and yield compared to previous years.
  • Additionally, as the Commission for Agricultural Costs and Prices (CACP) stated in its report, this led to production of a lower quality of jute fibre in 2020-21 as water-logging in large fields resulted in farmers harvesting the crop prematurely.
  • Acreage issues were accompanied by hoarding at all levels – right from the farmers to the traders.

Where does India stand in comparison to Bangladesh?

  • As per the Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO), India is the largest producer of jute followed by Bangladesh and China.
  • However, in terms of acreage and trade, Bangladesh takes the lead accounting for three-fourth of the global jute exports in comparison to India’s 7%.
  • This can be attributed to the fact that India lags behind Bangladesh in producing superior quality jute fibre due to infrastructural constraints and varieties suitable for the country’s agro-climate.
  • Further, as the CACP report stated, Bangladesh provides cash subsidies for varied semi-finished and finished jute products.
  • Hence, the competitiveness emerges as a challenge for India to explore export options in order to compensate for the domestic scenario.

What is at stake?

  • The jute sector provides direct employment to 3.70 lakh workers in the country.
  • It supports the livelihood of around 40 lakh farm families, closure of the mills is a direct blow to workers and indirectly, to the farmers whose production is used in the mills.
  • West Bengal, Bihar and Assam account for almost 99% of India’s total production.

 

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Textile Sector – Cotton, Jute, Wool, Silk, Handloom, etc.

Textile Industry in India

Note4Students

From UPSC perspective, the following things are important :

Prelims level : Fourth industrial revolution

Mains level : Paper 3- Textile industry in South Asia and challenges ahead

Context

South Asia became a major player in the global textiles and clothing market with the onset of the third wave of global production.

Textile industry in Bangladesh

  • Bangladesh overtook India in exports in the past decade as Indian labour costs resulted in products becoming 20% more expensive.
  • Bangladesh joined the league in the 1980s, owing to the outbreak of the civil war in Sri Lanka.
  • Lower production costs and free trade agreements with western buyers are what favour Bangladesh, which falls third in the line as a global exporter.
  • Bangladesh has been ahead of time in adopting technology.
  • Bangladesh also concentrates on cotton products, specialising in the low-value and mid-market price segment.

Where does India stand?

  • The progress of India and Pakistan in readymade garments is recent when compared to their established presence in textiles.
  • India holds a 4% share of the U.S.$840 billion global textile and apparel market, and is in fifth position.
  • India has been successful in developing backward links, with the aid of the Technical Upgradation Fund Scheme (TUFS), in the cotton and technical textiles industry.
  • However, India is yet to move into man-made fibres as factories still operate in a seasonal fashion.

Challenges ahead

1] Fourth Industrial revolution and robotic automation

  • The Fourth Industrial Revolution (4IR) has been shifting focus from production machinery to integrating technology in the entire production life cycle.
  • The production cycle incorporates all digital information and automation including robotics, artificial intelligence (AI), virtual reality, 3D printing, etc.
  • Robotic automation exemplifies production efficiency, especially in areas such as cutting and colour accuracy.
  • The Asian Development Bank anticipates the challenges of job losses and disruption, inequality and political instability, concentration of market power by global giants and more vulnerability to cyberattacks.
  •  With a 7% unemployment rate, India faces the challenge of job creation in the wake of increased automation.
  • The World Bank expects this trend to accelerate in the post-COVID-19 market.
  • The 4IR may result in unemployment or poor employment generation, primarily affecting a low skill workforce.

2] Sustainability challenge

  • Sustainability is also an important consideration for foreign buyers.
  • Bangladesh’s readymade garments initiated ‘green manufacturing’ practices to help conserve energy, water, and resources.
  • Textile and apparel effluents account for 17%-20% of all water pollution.
  •  The Indian government is committed to promoting sustainability through project sustainable resolution.

3] Labour issues

  • Access to affordable labour continues to be an advantage for south Asia.
  •  In addition, a country such as India with a very high number of scientists and engineers could lead, as is evident in the areas of drones, AI and blockchain.
  • India’s potential lies in its resources, infrastructure, technology, demographic dividend and policy framework.
  • The creation of a Centre for the Fourth Industrial Revolution is indicative of India’s intent.

Way forward

  • Digitalisation and automation in areas such as design, prototyping, and production are key in order to stay abreast, and in controlling production quality and timely delivery.
  • Sustainable practices such as regenerative organic farming (that focuses on soil health, animal welfare, and social fairness), sustainable manufacturing energy (renewable sources of energy are used) and circularity are being adopted.
  • Tax exemptions or reductions in imported technology, accessibility to financial incentives, maintaining political stability and establishing good trade relations are some of the fundamental forms of support the industry needs from governments.
  • The U.S. trade war on China owing to human rights violations along with its economic bottlenecks, opens doors for India and Pakistan as they have strong production bases.
  • Similar to China, India has a big supply — from raw material to garments.
  • Bangladesh has also risen as a top exporter in a cost competitive global market.
  • India’s proposed investments of US$1.4 billion and the establishment of all-in-one textile parks are expected to increase employment and ease of trade.
  • India extended tax rebates in apparel export till 2024, with the twin goals of competitiveness and policy stability.
  • Labour law reforms, additional incentives, income tax relaxations, duty reductions for man-made fibre, etc. are other notable moves.
  •  Newer approaches in the areas of compliance, transparency, occupational safety, sustainable production, etc. are inevitable changes in store for South Asia to sustain and grow business.
  • Finally, there is a need for governments’ proactive support in infrastructure, capital, liquidity and incentivisation.

Conclusion

Ensuring government support for financial incentives, upgrading technologies and reskilling labour are key challenges.

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Textile Sector – Cotton, Jute, Wool, Silk, Handloom, etc.

[pib] Amended Technology Up-gradation Fund Scheme

Note4Students

From UPSC perspective, the following things are important :

Prelims level : ATUFS

Mains level : Textile sector of India

Union Minister of Textiles has reviewed the Amended Technology Up-gradation Fund Scheme (ATUFS) to ease of doing business, bolstering exports & fuelling employment.

What is ATUFS?

  • The Ministry of Textiles had introduced Technology Upgradation Fund Scheme (TUFS) in 1999.
  • It is a credit linked subsidy scheme intended for modernization and technology up-gradation of the Indian textile industry.
  • It aims at promoting ease of doing business, generating employment and promoting exports. Since then, the scheme has been implemented in different versions.
  • The ongoing ATUFS has been approved in 2016 and implemented through web based iTUFS platform.
  • Capital Investment Subsidy is provided to benchmarked machinery installed by the industry after physical verification.

 

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Textile Sector – Cotton, Jute, Wool, Silk, Handloom, etc.

Khadi industry in India

Note4Students

From UPSC perspective, the following things are important :

Prelims level : Khadi Mark Regulation

Mains level : Paper 3- Issues facing khadi promotion in India

Context

The Prime Minister has repeatedly stressed his support for khadi, cottage industries, crafts and handlooms.

About Khadi

  • Genuine khadi or khaddar is woven from short-stapled organically grown cotton.
  • The beauty is in its uneven texture and colours, as cotton bolls are not all pure white in every region.
  • Fabrics being made today in the name of khadi are modified spin-offs that look more like handloom fabric, with mill-produced yarn, screen printed and often mixed with mill-made polyester.

Issues

  • Restriction of scope: According to the Khadi Mark Regulations (KMR) of 2013, no textile can be sold or otherwise traded by any person or institution as khadi or a khadi product in any form if the khadi mark tag issued by KVIC is missing.
  • This restricts the scope of trade to a few approved entities, thereby creating recognisable barriers to enter the market for khadi.
  • Restrictive certification process: The certification process described in Chapter V (Clause 20 (a)) of the KMR requires accredited agencies to perform an on-site verification of hand-spinning and hand-weaving processes.”
  • Yarn must be procured only from KVIC depots or the Cotton Corporation of India, descriptions of mechanisation and electrification are ambiguous.
  • There are so many restrictions that most producers have no incentive and many small bodies are unable to pay Rs 50,000 for certification.
  • Multiple authorities: Hand-spinning and weaving are also part of craft skills. Only the hand-spun part is additional in khadi.
  • But today KVIC, on its website and in its catalogue, has visibly non-hand-spun silk-printed saris, polyester fabrics and others that seem clearly machine-printed.
  • The KVIC online catalogue has products like industrially-made suitcases, bags and wallets which are under MSME, but with a “khadi” label.
  • This points to the need for bringing khadi and all handicrafts together in one ministry.

Conclusion

Gandhi did not intend to create a police state for the khadi sector, full of acts and rules that put production in a straitjacket. Perhaps, some courageous producers can try circumventing all this by using the word “khaddar” on their labels instead.

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Textile Sector – Cotton, Jute, Wool, Silk, Handloom, etc.

Catching up on PLI scheme for textile sector

Note4Students

From UPSC perspective, the following things are important :

Prelims level : MMF vs natural fibre

Mains level : Paper 3- PLI for textile sector

Context

The Cabinet approved the Production-Linked Incentive (PLI) scheme for the textile sector that is expressly targeted at the man-made fibre (MMF) and technical textiles segments.

Why India needs to focus on Man-made fibre (MMF) in textile trade

  • Preference for MMF:  The MMF surpassed cotton as the fibre of choice in the 1990s.
  • The MMFs share in worldwide textile consumption is about 75%.
  • Dominance of natural fibre in India’s export: India’s textile and clothing exports have continued to remain dominated by cotton and other natural fibre-based products.
  • The MMF have contributed less than 30% of the country’s $35.6 billion in overall sectoral exports in 2017-18.
  • While policy makers have been cognisant of the need to bolster support for the MMF segment.

About the scheme

  • The PLI scheme has a budgeted outlay of ₹10,683 crore.
  • Incentive at two levels: The incentives have been categorised into two investment levels.
  • First level: Firms investing at least ₹300 crore into plant and machinery over two years would need to hit a minimum turnover of ₹600 crore before becoming eligible to receive the incentive over a five-year period.
  • Second level: At a second level an investment of ₹100 crore with a pre-set minimum turnover of ₹200 crore would enable qualification for the incentive.
  • Intermediate products included: The aim of the scheme is to specifically focus investment attention on 40 MMF apparel product lines, 14 MMF fabric lines and 10 segments or products of technical textiles.
  • The inclusion of intermediate products reflects the Government’s keenness to ensure the scheme ultimately delivers on the broader policy objectives.

Conclusion

Operational success of the scheme is likely to hinge on how new entrepreneurs and existing companies weigh the risk-reward equation, especially at a time when the pandemic-spurred uncertainty has already made private businesses leery of making fresh capital expenditure.

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Textile Sector – Cotton, Jute, Wool, Silk, Handloom, etc.

PLI Scheme for Textiles

Note4Students

From UPSC perspective, the following things are important :

Prelims level : PLI scheme for various sectors

Mains level : Textile sector of India

The Union Government has approved Production Linked Incentive (PLI) Scheme for Textiles.  This move is a part of the overall announcement of PLI Schemes for 13 sectors made earlier during the Union Budget 2021-22.

What is PLI Scheme?

  • As the name suggests, the scheme provides incentives to companies for enhancing their domestic manufacturing apart from focusing on reducing import bills and improving the cost competitiveness of local goods.
  • PLI scheme offers incentives on incremental sales for products manufactured in India.
  • The scheme for respective sectors has to be implemented by the concerned ministries and departments.

Criteria laid for the scheme

  • Eligibility criteria for businesses under the PLI scheme vary based on the sector approved under the scheme.
  • For instance, the eligibility for telecom units is subject to the achievement of a minimum threshold of cumulative incremental investment and incremental sales of manufactured goods.
  • The minimum investment threshold for MSME is Rs 10 crore and Rs 100 crores for others.
  • Under food processing, SMEs and others must hold over 50 per cent of the stock of their subsidiaries, if any.
  • On the other hand, for businesses under pharmaceuticals, the project has to be a greenfield project while the net worth of the company should not be less than 30 per cent of the total committed investment.

What are the incentives involved?

  • An incentive of 4-6 per cent was offered last year on mobile and electronic components manufacturers such as resistors, transistors, diodes, etc.
  • Similarly, 10 percent incentives were offered for six years (FY22-27) of the scheme for the food processing industry.
  • For white goods too, the incentive of 4-6 per cent on incremental sales of goods manufactured in India for a period of five years was offered to companies engaged in the manufacturing of air conditioners and LED lights.

What is in the box for Textiles?

  • The PLI scheme for textiles aims to promote the production of high value Man-Made Fibre (MMF) fabrics, garments and technical textiles.
  • Any person or company willing to invest a minimum of Rs 300 crore in plant, machinery, equipment and civil works (excluding land and administrative building cost) to produce products of MMF fabrics, garments and products of technical textiles will be eligible.
  • Investors willing to spend a minimum of Rs 100 crore under the same conditions shall be eligible.

Benefits offered

  • PLI scheme for Textiles will promote production of high value MMF Fabric, Garments and Technical Textiles in country.
  • The incentive structure has been so formulated that the industry will be encouraged to invest in fresh capacities in these segments.
  • This will give a major push to the growing high-value MMF segment which will complement the efforts of the cotton and other natural fiber-based textiles industry.
  • This will help to generate new opportunities for employment and trade, resultantly helping India regain its historical dominant status in global textiles trade.

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Back2Basics: India’s textile sector

  • The textile industry in India traditionally, after agriculture, is the only industry that has generated huge employment for both skilled and unskilled labour.
  • The domestic textiles and apparel industry contributes 5% to India’s GDP, 7% of industry output in value terms, and 12% of the country’s export earnings.
  • The textile industry continues to be the second-largest employment generating sector in India. It offers direct employment to over 35 million in the country.
  • India is first in global jute production and shares 63% of the global textile and garment market. India is second in global textile manufacturing and also second in silk and cotton production.
  • 100% FDI is allowed via automatic route in textile sector.

Textile Sector – Cotton, Jute, Wool, Silk, Handloom, etc.

[pib] Hathkargha Samvardhan Sahayata (HSS) Yojana

Note4Students

From UPSC perspective, the following things are important :

Prelims level : HSS scheme

Mains level : Textile sector of India

The Ministry of Textiles introduced the technology up-gradation scheme called Hathkargha Samvardhan Sahayata (HSS) Yojana.

Much recently, in the budget, the Mega Investment Textiles Parks (MITRA) Scheme was launched.

HSS Yojana

  • This scheme is introduced as an up-gradation scheme under National Handloom Development Programme (NHDP) and Comprehensive Handloom Cluster Development Scheme (CHCDS) in 2015-16.
  • It aims to provide upgraded looms/accessories to handloom weavers to improve the quality of the fabric and enhance productivity.
  • Under the scheme, the Union Govt bears 90% of the cost of looms/accessories.
  • It is designed for all the weavers, including SC/ST/OBC and women.
  • The performance of this scheme will be evaluated by independent third-party agencies.

Textile Sector – Cotton, Jute, Wool, Silk, Handloom, etc.

[pib] Mega Investment Textiles Parks (MITRA) Scheme

Note4Students

From UPSC perspective, the following things are important :

Prelims level : MITRA scheme

Mains level : Textile sector of India

The Finance Minister has proposed setting up of a scheme of Mega Investment Textiles Parks (MITRA) Scheme in her budget speech.

Do not get confused over Sahakar Mitra Scheme and this one.

MITRA Scheme

  • MITRA aims to enable the textile industry to become globally competitive, attract large investments, and boost employment generation and exports.
  • It will create world-class infrastructure with plug and play facilities to enable create global champions in exports.
  • It will be launched in addition to the Production Linked Incentive Scheme (PLI).
  • It will give our domestic manufacturers a level-playing field in the international textiles market & pave the way for India to become a global champion of textiles exports across all segments”.

Textile Sector – Cotton, Jute, Wool, Silk, Handloom, etc.

Rebate of State Levies (ROSL) Scheme

Note4Students

From UPSC perspective, the following things are important :

Prelims level : Rebate of State Levies (ROSL) Scheme

Mains level : Textile sector of India and its global competitiveness

The Department of Revenue has allowed the release of pending Rebate of State Levies (RoSL) worth Rs 464.13 crore to garment exporters.

We may expect a prelim question like- “The Rebate of State Levies (ROSL) Scheme is related to which of the following industrial sector? ” with some unrelatedly looking options.

Rebate of State Levies (ROSL) Scheme

  • Last year, the Union Cabinet has approved the Scheme to Rebate State and Central Embedded Taxes to Support the Textile Sector.
  • The scheme aimed to reimburse the State levies that garment and made-up exports incurred.
  • But it was discontinued on and replaced with the Rebate of State and Central Taxes and Levies scheme.

Why was such a scheme needed?

  • ROSL plays a vital role for the exporters by providing zero-rated taxation on apparel and made-up products.
  • This scheme enabled the exporters to increase traffic, enhance competitiveness among the global market, and compete against countries such as Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, Cambodia and Vietnam, who enjoy zero taxation.
  • This also benefits the traders who export to the European Union (EU), India’s largest export market for the apparel sector, facing a tariff variation of 9.6 per cent.

Textile Sector – Cotton, Jute, Wool, Silk, Handloom, etc.

National Technical Textiles Mission

Note4Students

From UPSC perspective, the following things are important :

Prelims level : Technical Textiles, About the Mission

Mains level : Textile sector of India and its global competitiveness

The Cabinet Committee on Economic Affairs has given its approval to set up a National Technical Textiles Mission with a view to position the country as a global leader in Technical Textiles.

What are Technical Textiles?

  • Technical textile is a textile product manufactured for non-aesthetic purposes, where the function is primary criterion.
  • They are functional fabrics that have applications across various industries including automobiles, civil engineering and construction, agriculture, healthcare, industrial safety, personal protection etc.
  • Technical Textiles is a high technology sunrise sector which is steadily gaining ground in. India.

National Technical Textiles Mission

  • The Mission would have a four year implementation period from FY 2020-21 to 2023-24.
  • It will move into sunset phase after four years period.
  • A Mission Directorate in the Min. of Textiles headed by an eminent expert in the related field will be made operational.
  • The Directorate will not have any permanent employment and there will be no creation of building infrastructure for the Mission purpose.

Components of the mission

Component-I:  Promoting both (i) fundamental research at fibre level and (ii) application-based research in geo-textiles, agro-textiles, medical textiles, mobile textiles and sports textiles and development of bio­degradable technical textiles.

Component-II: Promotion and Market Development.

Component-III: Export promotion of technical textiles and ensuring 10% average growth in exports per year upto 2023-24. An Export Promotion Council for Technical Textiles will be set up for this purpose.

Component-IV: Promoting technical education at higher engineering and technology levels related to technical textiles.

Textile Sector – Cotton, Jute, Wool, Silk, Handloom, etc.

Purified Terephthalic Acid (PTA)

Note4Students

From UPSC perspective, the following things are important :

Prelims level : PTA and its uses

Mains level : Not Much

  • During her Budget speech, FM Mrs. Sitharaman said that the government was abolishing in “public interest” an anti-dumping duty that was levied on imports of a chemical called PTA.
  • Domestic manufacturers of polyester have called the move a huge relief for the industry, claiming they had been fighting to remove the duty for four-and-a-half years.

What is PTA?

  • Purified Terephthalic Acid (PTA) is a crucial raw material used to make various products, including polyester fabrics.
  • PTA makes up for around 70-80% of a polyester product and is, therefore, important to those involved in the manufacture of man-made fabrics or their components, according to industry executives.
  • This includes products like polyester staple fibre and spun yarn.
  • Our cushions and sofas may have polyester staple fibre fillings. Some sportswear, swimsuits, dresses, trousers, curtains, sofa covers, jackets, car seat covers and bed sheets have a certain proportion of polyester in them.

What led to the government decision?

  • There has been persistent demand that they should be allowed to source that particular product at an affordable rate, even if it means importing it.
  • She had said easy availability of this “critical input” at competitive prices was desirable to unlock “immense” potential in the textile sector, seen as a “significant” employment generator.
  • The duty had meant importers were paying an extra $27-$160 for every 1,000 kg of PTA that they wanted to import from countries like China, Taiwan, Malaysia, Indonesia, Iran, Korea and Thailand.
  • Removing the duty will allow PTA users to source from international markets and may make it as much as $30 per 1,000 kg cheaper than now, according to industry executives.

Textile Sector – Cotton, Jute, Wool, Silk, Handloom, etc.

[pib] Patola Saree

Note4Students

From UPSC perspective, the following things are important :

Prelims level : Patola Saree

Mains level : Promoting Khadi and village industries

In a historic initiative taken by Khadi and Village Industries Commission (KVIC), a first Silk Processing Plant was inaugurated at Surendranagar in Gujarat.

It would help cut down the cost of production of silk yarn drastically and increase the sale and availability of raw material for Gujarati Patola Sarees.

Patola Sarees

  • Patola is a double ikat (dying technique) woven sari, usually made from silk made in Patan, Gujarat.
  • They are very expensive, once worn only by those belonging to royal and aristocratic families. These saris are popular among those who can afford the high prices.
  • Reason being the raw material silk yarn is purchased from Karnataka or West Bengal, where silk processing units are situated, thus increasing the cost of the fabric manifolds.
  • Patola-weaving is a closely guarded family tradition. There are three families in Patan that weave these highly prized double ikat saris.
  • It can take six months to one year to make one sari due to the long process of dying each strand separately before weaving them together.

Textile Sector – Cotton, Jute, Wool, Silk, Handloom, etc.

[pib] Project SURE

Note4Students

From UPSC perspective, the following things are important :

Prelims level : Project SURE

Mains level : Not Much


  • The Union Minister for Textiles launched Project SURE, a move towards sustainable fashion.

Project SURE

  • The SURE project is a commitment by India’s apparel industry to set a sustainable pathway for the Indian fashion industry.
  • SURE stands for ‘Sustainable Resolution’ – a firm commitment from the industry to move towards fashion that contributes to a clean environment.
  • The project has been launched by the Minister, along with Clothing Manufacturers Association of India (CMAI); United Nations in India; and IMG Reliance, the organizers of Lakme Fashion Week.
  • It will be the first holistic effort by the apparel industry towards gradually introducing a broader framework for establishing critical sustainability goals for the industry.
  • This framework would help the industry reduce its carbon emissions, increase resource efficiency, tackle waste and water management, and create positive social impact to achieve long-term sustainability targets.

Five-point Sustainable Resolution

  • Develop a complete understanding of the environmental impact of the garments being currently produced by our brand.
  • Develop a sustainable sourcing policy for consistently prioritizing and utilizing certified raw materials that have a positive impact on the environment.
  • Make the right decisions about how, where, and what we source across the value chain by selecting sustainable and renewable materials and processes and ensuring their traceability.
  • Communicate our sustainability initiatives effectively to consumers and media through our online and physical stores, product tags/labeling, social media, advertising campaigns and events.
  • Through these actions, shift a significant percentage of our supply chain to a sustainable chain by the year 2025, addressing critical global issues such as climate change, contributing to the UN Sustainable Development Goals, and building a world that is safe for the future generations, as an acceptance of a responsibility we all share.

Textile Sector – Cotton, Jute, Wool, Silk, Handloom, etc.

[pib] Muga Silk

Note4Students

From UPSC perspective, the following things are important :

Prelims level : Muga Silk

Mains level : Not Much


  • For Conservation of Muga Silk in natural habitat the Government of India has approved a project on conservation of Muga in natural habitat in Assam, Arunachal Pradesh, Bodoland Territorial Council (BTC) and Meghalaya.

Muga Silk

  • Muga silk is a variety of wild silk geographically tagged to the state of Assam in India.
  • The silk is known for its extreme durability and has a natural yellowish-golden tint with a shimmering, glossy texture.
  • It was previously reserved for the use of royalty.
  • In the Brahmaputra Valley, the larvae of the Assam silkmoth feed on aromatic som (Machilus bombycina) and sualu (Litsea polyantha) leaves.
  • Muga silk can be dyed after bleaching. This silk can be hand-washed with its lustre increasing after every wash.
  • Muga silk, like other Assam silks, is used in products like saris, mekhalas and chadors.
  • Muga silk was recognized as a protected geographical indication (GI) in 2007, and was granted a GI logo for trademark purposes in 2014.

Protecting in its natural habitat

  • Under Integrated Sericulture Development Project (ISDP) of North East Region Textile Promotion Scheme (NERTPS), the Government of India has approved a project on conservation of Muga in natural habitat in Assam.
  • The scheme is being implemented in the following areas:
  1. Upper Doigrung Wild Life area, KarbiAnglong / Golaghat, Assam
  2. Kuklung Reserve Forest range for muga ex-situ conservation site in BTC
  3. Mebo Reserve Forest, Pasighat Forest Division, Pasighat in Arunachal Pradesh
  4. Bagmara Reserve forest, Balpakram National Park, and Tura Peak in Meghalaya

Textile Sector – Cotton, Jute, Wool, Silk, Handloom, etc.

Project ReWeave enables handloom weavers to sell crafts online

Note4students

Mains Paper 3: Economy | Effects of liberalization on the economy, changes in industrial policy and their effects on industrial growth

From UPSC perspective, the following things are important:

Prelims level: Project ReWeave

Mains level: The importance of textiles and apparels industry and issues related to it.


News

  • Microsoft India Saturday announced the launch of a new e-commerce platform here for handloom weavers under its Project ReWeave, as part of its philanthropic initiative.

Project ReWeave

  1. It is e-commerce platform that would help connect artisans to the buyers directly enabling them to expand to newer customers and markets.
  2. It hosts signature collections created by the weaver communities, showcase traditional designs and products created from natural dyes.
  3. It would help sell to a broad set of customers, support weavers in increasing their income and earning a sustainable livelihood while also reviving traditional forgotten Indian art.
  4. Microsoft, in association with the National Institute of Fashion Technology (NIFT), has also curated a special curriculum in ‘CAD and Colour for Handloom Weaving’ to provide digital training in handloom design.

Benefits of such initiatives

  1. With the introduction of our new e-commerce platform, digital empowerment centres and the new design curriculum, the weavers will be able to build on the rich handloom heritage of India and also reach out to a wider customer base.
  2. These initiatives like e-commerce marketplace and design training would ensure weaver communities sustain themselves and provide livelihood to artisans.
  3. This also is a practical solution to motivate younger generation of weavers to continue with their traditions and not divert into other professions.

Textile Sector – Cotton, Jute, Wool, Silk, Handloom, etc.

[pib] Yarn Bank Scheme

 

Note4students

Mains Paper 3: Economy | Effects of liberalization on the economy, changes in industrial policy and their effects on industrial growth

From UPSC perspective, the following things are important:

Prelims level: Yarn Bank Scheme

Mains level: The importance of textiles and apparels industry and issues related to it.


News

Yarn Bank Scheme

  1. To avoid fluctuation in yarn price, government has launched a Yarn Bank Scheme as one of the component of PowerTex India with effect from 01.04.2017 to 31.03.2020.
  2. The Scheme provides interest free corpus fund up to Rs.2.00 crore to the Special Purpose Vehicle (SPV)/Consortium formed by powerloom weavers to enable them to purchase yarn at wholesale rate and give the yarn at reasonable price to the small weavers
  3. It aims to avoid middleman and local supplier’s brokerage charge on sales of yarn.

Objectives

  1. To provide interest free corpus fund to Special Purpose Vehicle (SPV) / Consortium to enable them to purchase yarn at wholesale rate and give the yarn at reasonable price to the small weavers.
  2. To avoid middle man/ local supplier’s brokerage charge on sales of yarn.

Eligibility Beneficiaries

  1. Registered Co-operative Society.
  2. Trusts
  3. Company set-up under the Companies Act, 1956 as amended.
  4. Firm set-up under the Limited Liability Partnership Act, 2008 as amended.
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